Canada History

 

Prisma Cruises
Canada History   timelines 
AskAHistorian    blog 
 
 
Membership

 

         
 

Canadahistory.com

 

Canadahistory.com

         

Arts | Colonial | Empire | Explorers | Federal | Frontier | International  | Leaders | National | Native | News | Regional | United States | War

Address de la Confederation | Andrew Drew | Annexation Manifesto | Annexation Movement | Baldwin Opposition | Christie NWT | Chronicles of Frontenac | Death of Wolfe and Montcalm | Devercheres | Dubas Canada | Elgin to Grey | Elizabeth Lount | English Aggression | Galissonieres Memoir | Galts Letter | Issac Buchanan | Jesus Missionary | Lactedel union | Laura Secord | Lord Durhams Report | Lord Elgin | Mackenzie Rebellion | Marquis de Seignelay | Memoir on English Aggression | New France | New York Hearld | Quebec Act 1774 | Reciprocity | Robson Canada Bill | Stoney Creek | Treaty of Paris 1763 | Union of Upper and Lower Canada | Union | Voyages Champlain | Voyages Champlain II | Voyages Champlain III | Voyages of Radisson


1759 - The Deaths of Wolfe and Montcalm the Plains of Abraham, September 19
by Francis Parkman (1829-99)

Wolfe was everywhere. How cool he was, and why his followers loved him, is shown by an incident that happened in the course of the morning. One of his captains was shot through the lungs; and on recovering consciousness he saw the general standing at his side. Wolfe pressed his hand, told him not to despair, praised his services, promised him an early promotion, and sent an aide-de-camp to Monckton to beg that officer to keep the promise if he himself should fall.

It was towards ten o'clock when, from the high ground on the right of the line, Wolfe saw that the crisis was near. The French on the ridge had formed themselves into three bodies, regulars in the centre, regulars and Canadians on the right and left. Two field-pieces, which had been dragged up the heights at Anse du Foulon, fired on them with grape-shot, and the troops, rising from the ground, prepared to receive them. In a few moments more they were in motion. They came on rapidly, uttering loud shouts, and firing as soon as they were within range. Their ranks, ill ordered at the best, were further confused by a number of Canadians who had been mixed among the regulars, and who, after hastily firing, threw themselves on the ground to reload. The British advanced a few rods; then halted and stood still. When the French were within forty paces the word of command rang out, and a crash of musketry answered all along the line. The volley was delivered with remarkable precision. In the battalions of the centre, which had suffered least from the enemy's bullets, the simultaneous explosion was afterwards said by French officers to have sounded like a cannon-shot. Another volley followed, and then a furious clattering fire that lasted but a minute or two. When the smoke rose, a miserable sight was revealed: the ground cumbered with dead and wounded, the advancing masses stopped short and turned into a frantic mob, shouting, cursing, gesticulating. The order was given to charge. Then over the field rose the British cheer, mixed with the fierce yell of the Highland slogan.

Some of the corps pushed forward with the bayonet; some advanced firing. The clansmen drew their broadswords and dashed on, keen and swift as bloodhounds. At the English right, though the attacking column was broken to pieces, a fire was still kept up, chiefly, it seems, by sharpshooters from the bushes and cornfields, where they had lain for an hour or more. Here Wolfe himself led the charge, at the head of the Louisbourg grenadiers. A shot shattered his wrist. He wrapped his handkerchief about it and kept on. Another shot struck him, and he still advanced, when a third lodged in his breast. He staggered, and sat on the ground. Lieutenant Brown, of the grenadiers, one Henderson, a volunteer in the same company, and a private soldier, aided by an officer of artillery who ran to join them, carried him in their arms to the rear.

He begged them to lay him down. They did so, and asked if he would have a surgeon. "There's no need," he answered; "it's all over with me." A moment after, one of them cried out: "They run; see how they run. Who run?" Wolfe demanded, like a man roused from sleep. "The enemy, sir. Egad, they give way everywhere Go, one of you, to Colonel Burton," returned the dying man; "tell him to march Webb's regiment down to Charles River, to cut off their retreat from the bridge." Then, turning on his side, he murmured, "Now, God be praised, I will die in peace!" and in a few moments his gallant soul had fled.

Montcalm, still on horseback, was borne with the tide of fugitives towards the town. As he approached the walls a shot passed through his body. He kept his seat; two soldiers supported him, one on each side, and led his horse through the St. Louis Gate. On the open space within, among the excited crowd, were several women, drawn, no doubt, by eagerness to know the result of the fight. One of them recognized him, saw the streaming blood, and shrieked, "O mon Dieu! mon Dieu! le Marquis est tué!"

"It's nothing, it's nothing," replied the dead stricken man; "don't be troubled for me, my friends. "("Ce n'est rien; ne vous affligez pas pour mes bonnes amies.")

***

Source: Francis Parkman, Montcalm and Wolfe (1884)

 



Article/Document/Material Source:
Reference: www.canadahistory.com/sections/documents/documents.html