Louisbourg

 

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Louisbourg was the French Gibraltar in North America. Strategically located on Cape Breton Island in Nova Scotia, it was positioned to intercept any vessels or fleets intending to sail up the St Lawrence River. Built between 1719 and 1745 Louisbourg had become not only a fort but a settlement which thrived due to the cod industry which booming along the Grand Banks just off shore.

Louisbourg was attacked in 1745 by forces from New England and was taken within 1 1/2 months but when peace was made between France and England it was restored to France. In 1758 as the 7 years war raged, Louisbourg was attacked once again and fell to general James Wolfe. It was not returned to this time and with in 2 years, New France had fallen to England never to be revived.

In 1961 the restoration of the Fortress began and today it is the largest Fortress from that era in North America. The site and buildings themselves are spectacular and the interpretive presentation by the Parks Canada staff is excellent. This is a site that you can easily spend a couple of days at and still want more.




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